Our trusty 50 year old brushing machine, which we still use today.

Our trusty 50 year old brushing machine, which we still use today.

Making a garment
The key to our success is retaining the original quality of a hand-crafted garment. There are multiple procedures involved in the manufacturing process, and most are carried out by hand. Harley of Scotland's reputation of manufacturing the highest quality knitwear in the world is earned by conducting quality checks at each stage in the production cycle.

The knitting department - the heart of our company.

The knitting department - the heart of our company.

Knitting
A traditional knit garment is made up of several individual panels. Each individual knitted panel is checked by hand to ensure that it meets with our standards. We are one of the few private knitwear manufacturers to offer traditional fully fashioned and ‘seamless’ knitwear. Using the revolutionary ‘seamless’ production technique, which we now have 13 years of experience in, each garment is knitted in a single unit. This has the hugely desirable outcome of eliminating the need for joining of components, producing a sleeker, and often better fitting garment.

Oiled raw yarn during the knit before milling and finishing via our soft water 'wet-finishing' process

Oiled raw yarn during the knit before milling and finishing via our soft water 'wet-finishing' process

Milling
The yarn in the knitted panels is still ‘greasy’ at this stage, and these panels are linked together to create the basic body ‘shape’. Washing garments in Scotland’s soft water is essential in achieving the uniquely soft and luxurious ‘handle’ of a Harley of Scotland garment. The traditional skill of milling garments is passed from generation to generation.

Aldona preparing to Mathbirk some fair isles.

Aldona preparing to Mathbirk some fair isles.

Clean make-up
The washed garment passes through the Clean make-up area where a number of highly skilled processes are carried out. Perfecting the time-honored skills in garment make-up can take up to 18 months. Among these is the ‘Mathbirk’ process, which is a combined linking and over locking method to bind garment panels together, resulting in a strong tensile seamed garment.

Jane quality-inspecting a completed seamless garment at the end of the production line.

Jane quality-inspecting a completed seamless garment at the end of the production line.

Pressing and finishing
Each garment is pressed with the greatest of care, ironed, labelled, checked and packed ready for delivery to our customers. It is absolutely vital to us that these completed garments are perfect, achieved only by employing an experienced, competent and dedicated workforce.